More well developed orthopaedic prediction models

It seems that appropriate methodology in the development of prediction models is becoming more common in our field. These two recent studies caught my attention: Development of a model to predict the probability of incurring a complication during spine surgery and Prediction of 90-day mortality after total hip arthroplasty. Both studies report calibration performance and […]

Orthopaedic journals really stand out and not in a good way

Preprint policy of majority of academic journals can be found in the Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_academic_journals_by_preprint_policy. Some 130 journals can be found in the list. Large majority of journals allow preprints prior to submission. Few journals have restrictions. Four journals glow in red since journal policy does not allow preprints. Which journals would they be? These journals […]

The fallacy of “meniscal of symptoms”: part 2

I don´t have anything else to add to my post from yesterday, besides what MacFarlane conclude: “Meniscal symptoms” were not associated with improved pain relief. Although symptoms of clicking and intermittent locking had a greater reduction in the APM group, the presence of “meniscal symptoms” in isolation should not inform clinical decisions surrounding APM vs. […]

The fallacy of “meniscal symptoms”

A long story short. Farina et al. conclude: Contrary to current dogma, this study demonstrates that traditionally defined “meniscal” and “mechanical” knee symptoms are strongly associated with the burden and severity of underlying cartilage damage rather than with specific meniscal pathology. It is only relevant to ask how could an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy be an […]

Mesmerized by clinical prediction models

I am not a surgical oncologist but I came across with this study:  A deep survival interpretable radiomics model of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Authors conclude: In summary, novel deep radiomic analysis provides improved performance for risk assessment of HCC prognosis compared with Cox survival models and may facilitate stratification of HCC patients and personalization of […]

Problems in all-cause revision analyses in total joint replacement research?

I had a chance to collaborate with Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association in a study published in the Acta Orthopaedica last year. Study was titled “The effect of fixation type on the survivorship of contemporary total knee arthroplasty in patients younger than 65 years of age: a register-based study of 115,177 knees in the Nordic Arthroplasty […]

It´s all about explained variation in the periprosthetic joint infections

I showed this slide in my clinic meeting presentation which was about periprosthetic joint infections. Infection rates were very high in the early years of modern total joint replacement surgery in 1960s. Today, the risk of deep infection after a total hip or knee replacement surgery is something close to 1%. This major improvement is […]

Basics of artificial intelligence and machine learning for every trainee?

This was an interesting perspective: What Should Radiology Residency and Fellowship Training in Artificial Intelligence Include? A Trainee’s Perspective—Radiology In Training. Just some take from the commentary: Trainees should be introduced to the basic concepts of data collection, annotation, and algorithm validation. AI and ML are here to stay. Hence it is important that these […]

When we stop “treating” degeneration?

This is a second post about an excellent Invited Paper in the International Orthopaedics. Authors begin their paper as follows: The specialism of orthopaedic surgery covers many subdisciplines. Most of these deal with degenerative changes occurring as a result of the normal aging process. Some will follow trauma or are as a result of congenital […]